Seminar on WATER MANAGEMENT
Posted On : 23rd December 2011

Benjamin Franklin has said that "When the well is dry, we know the worth of water". 255 years after his mention, not only do we understand, but we are also perilously close to experiencing the true implications of "World Without Water" - WWW and this is very much relevant for survival of chemical industry for which water is main input and its continuous adequate supply is very much essential in running the chemical plants.

ICC gives prime importance to Water Management and Conservation in Chemical industry and has instituted an Award for this purpose. ICC receives nominations in good numbers for this Award every year. The responsible members of the chemical industry are taking steps in optimizing of water use and they have also initiated integrated water management initiatives and also application of new technologies.

To bring this burning issue of availability of water at competitive price for the industry and chemical industry particular, ICC has, under the auspices of Technology & Energy Expert Committee, organized a Two-day Seminar on "WATER MANAGEMENT" on 16-17 December 2011 at Hotel Vivanta By Taj - President, Cuffe Parade, Mumbai.


Mr. Yogesh M. Kothari, Vice President, ICC welcoming Dr. Mihir Shah with a bouquet of Flowers.

Dr. Mihir Shah, Member, Planning Commission, Government of India was the Chief Guest and delivered the keynote address.

Dr. Mihir Shah is an eminent economist having long standing experience in Water Conservation and Water Management in India. He was invited by Hon'ble Prime Minister of India Dr. Manmohan Singh to join the Planning Commission and currently he is involved in preparing the 12th Five Year Plan Policy Document.


Mr. Ramani Iyer, Member, Technology & Energy Expert Committee, ICC making the theme presentation about the Seminar.
Seated are: Mr. H. S. Karangle, Director General-ICC, Mr. S. R. Lohokare, hairman-Technology & Energy Expert Committee, ICC;

Dr. Mihir Shah, Member-Planning Commission, Govt. of India (Chief Guest) and Mr. Yogesh M. Kothari, Vice President-ICC. Excerpts from the keynote address: The lecture delivered by Dr. Mihir Shah was stimulating and thought provoking. He urged the chemical industry through Indian Chemical Council forum to partner with planning commission by giving inputs regarding:

  • Industry's concern on water availability
  • Industry's concern on water availability
  • Water Charges
  • New Technologies for recycling water
  • Reducing Water Consumption
  • Use of Sewage Water and it's pricing
  • Desalination approach
  • Setting of standards for Water Consumption
  • Incentives/Disincentives for the Water Consumption
  • Water Foot Print - that is volume of consumption and liquid waste generated
  • Voluntary reduction of Water Consumption


Dr. Mihir Shah, Member, Planning Commission, Govt. of India,
delivering the keynote address.

Some of the points that emerged during the key note address are:

  1. In India, currently large dams and tube wells are the main sources of water. However, there is now need to relook at the policy of constructing big dams which involves displacement of poor citizens for whom nothing has been done much for improving their quality of life. Besides there are no new sites available for construction of dams.
  2. The water resource is also not managed properly. The statistical information available with planning commission indicates that irrigated land through canals had not increased as per estimates projected at the time of clearing irrigation project. Besides cropping pattern is also different then what was originally projected.
  3. To many agricultural consumers, water is available at almost throw away price.
  4. Ground water extraction from tube wells is very high in the country and 80% is for irrigation and drinking water. Hydro-geology of the country is such that 70% is of hard rock foundation and ground water recharge of tube wells is extremely difficult and as such that tube wells dry up fast.
  5. Power supply to the agriculture is very uncertain in that no specific time schedule is announced for the water supply to the agriculturists. Clear time table for the supply is lacking. Power supply has to be customer centric and demand needs to be managed rationally.
  6. Some of the initiatives taken by Gujarat government setting up different feeders for agriculture and domestic consumers which has made a big difference. Government of Maharashtra (for setting of water regulatory authority) Andhra Pradesh (where farmers have joined for meeting their water requirement) are the lessons for other states to follow.
  7. Inter-connecting rivers, although sounds good, involves technical issues. The Indian rain fall system developed over Bay of Bengal and the sweet water which flows into the sea through discharge of rivers contribute for timely setting up of water cycles. If through interconnection of rivers is done, water flow going to the sea may be substantially affected causing serious impact on water cycle formation. Another factor is salinity levels in the sea affecting evaporation.
  8. Water is a State subject and therefore there are always conflicts of interest between the States and sometimes with Central government too. Current controversies between Kerala and Tamilnadu & also between Karnataka and Tamilnadu are examples to the issue.


A part view of the delegates who attended the two-day seminar.

Against these deficiencies in the system, Dr. Mihir Shah then went on to highlight the approach of the Planning Commission towards the 12th Five Year Plan Document. He said that basic objectives are:

  • To move away from undertaking big construction of dams to demand management of various stake holders.
  • Pricing of water based on consultative approach of all the stake holders.
  • Command area plan
  • New reform agenda benefit rural poor.

Dr. Shah highlighted following seven Focus Areas that have been identified to tackle the national water challenges in the 12th Plan (2012-2017) Document: They are broadly the following:

  1. Integrated surface water and ground water management for agriculture. This will shift the focus from the current supply side orientation to more efficient use of water. As against creating more storage & as seen from a strictly engineering viewpoint, it will create new models in capacity utilization.
  2. Redefine the boundaries with establishment of a better database & its management. For instance it will relook at aquifer mapping.
  3. Approaches to 'break the silos' between the various entities dealing with water. Bring together both drinking water & sanitation issues in urban water management. Foster habitation level approaches to development.
  4. Emphasize on partnerships.
  5. Facilitate a new institutional architecture at national and state/ULB level. Based on the 'Public Trust' concept of the Supreme Court, create a "National Water Commission', setting up 'Water Regulatory Authority' in all states. These will help monitor compliance of conditionality's and basic investment criteria in the water infrastructure
  6. Creation of a new 'National Framework Law' in water to govern centre and state management of water. A new Ground Water law for both centres & state governments.
  7. Special focus on the industrial and urban water sectors. Treat sewage water and drinking water in urban sector as an integrated challenge. Aim at industry adopting a voluntary water conservation policy, including a 'Water Pledge' by captains of industry. Foster 'Water Footprint' similar to 'Carbon Footprint'. Make 'Water audits' mandatory through legal measures

During the two-day deliberations, following presentations were made by experts from the government, industry and academia.

WATER REGULATORY POLICY FOR THE BENEFIT OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY
- Mr. V. V. Gaikwad, Member - Water Resources Engineering, Maharashtra Water Resources Regulatory Authority.

WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
- Mr. Ajay Pujar, Product Manager - Electromagnetic Flowmeter, Krohne Marshall Pvt. Ltd.

WATER MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER CONSERVATION
- Mr. T. M. Nagarajan, Head-Water Technologies, Siemens Limited

CASE STUDY: WATER CONSERVATION & MANAGEMENT - EXPERIENCE OF LANXESS INDIA PVT LTD
- Mr. Subhat Jindal, Associate G M - Production & Utilities, Lanxess India Pvt. Ltd.

CASE STUDY: SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT AT RCF
- Mr. S. B. Satam, Addl. Chief Engineer, Rashtriya Chemicals & Fertilizers Ltd.

CASE STUDY: WATER CONSERVATION & MANAGEMENT - EXPERIENCE OF CHEMPLAST SANMAR LTD.
- Mr. G. Sankara Subramanian, Asst. Vice President - Operations, Chemplast Sanmar Ltd.

CITIZEN SERVICES and GOVERNANCE, SANITARY IMPROVEMENT & SAFE DISPOSAL PRACTICES - INTEGRATED STORM WATER DISPOSAL SYSTEM
- Dr. Sanjay V. Pattiwar, Addl. Commissioner, Navi Mumbai Municipal Corporation

CRISIS MANAGEMENT OF WATER SUPPLY - SUSTAINING WATER SUPPLY OF MILLIONS
- Dr. Sanjay V. Dahasahasra, Former Member Secretary, Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran, Government of Maharashtra

WATER POLICY OF MIDC FOR THE BENEFIT OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY
- Mr. B. K. Verulkar, Superintending Engineer, Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation

WATER CONSERVATION THROUGH RECYCLING OF TREATED ETP WATER TO COOLING TOWERS USING PROPER WATER CHEMISTRY
- Mr. S. M. Mahadik, Executive Director, Chembond Ashland Water Technologies Ltd.

CASE STUDY: WATER CONSERVATION & MANAGEMENT - EXPERIENCE OF HEAVY WATER PLANT
- Mr. A. K. Agarwal, Associate Director - Operations, Heavy Water Board

CASE STUDY: WATER CONSERVATION & MANAGEMENT - EXPERIENCE OF TATA CHEMICALS
- Mr. V. S. Mathur, Head Env & PQA, CNAB , Tata Chemicals Ltd. &
- Ms. Neha Bhandari, Manager - Corp. Technical, Tata Chemicals Ltd.

PLASTICS IN WATER MANAGEMENT
- Mr. Abhijit Patil, Reliance Industries Ltd.

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